Category Archives: Leadership

Good Robot, Bad Robot

Last week, iRobot saw a weird news article about the mapping data in their very popular Roomba vacuums. I have long coveted a Roomba, thinking that one of these days I’m just going to break down and order one. That it would mean that my travertine floors would never again sprout a swirling dust bunny.

But the news stopped me cold, and might have permanently killed my “one day” wishes to own a Roomba of my own. At first, the story was that iRobot was going to begin selling the home mapping data that has been collected over the last few years, detailing many aspects of each customer’s home.
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Let’s Start Playing Fair

Throughout my life of learning, I've come across a lot of concepts that apply to today's politics and unrest, both in the US and the world. One of the biggest (in addition and in relation to empathy, which has also recently caught my interest) is the concept of "fairness".
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How Corporate America Fried My Brain

Have you heard the one about how long term stress reduces brain function? Well I guess I hadn't.

Not so very long ago, I was working a high-stress corporate job. The pace was incredible my team and I spent two years working 10 to 18 hour days to try to implement a global software solution.

I knew things felt harder that they should have been. I knew that I wasn't getting enough sleep. I knew that I barely had enough time to eat. And when I did eat, I knew that I was eating the wrong things.
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Protect the (Human) Machine

Today, I'm going to suggest that you are wasting your resources. Give this some consideration and you can get more done at work, at home and everywhere in between.

Let's say you are a plant manager, for a large manufacturing facility (just bear with me, even if you have never stepped foot into a factory). You have a piece of equipment, purchased recently or maybe even decades ago, that would cost well over $1 million to replace. Would you maintain it?
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Can Government Create Economic Value?

Raining CoinsWe live in “interesting times”.  I’ve heard a lot of complaints from friends, acquaintances and the media lately about how moribund our government has become.  It’s true not just in the US, but around most of the world.  Just when we need leaders to drive forward a variety of human, economic and environmental innovations, our elected officials appear to be uninterested in governing.  So who’s in charge when it comes to creating the kind of value that adds to the economy?

Citizens should be able to count on government to step in for intractable problems. We understand that these issues need a big voice and strong leadership to succeed. But structurally, I don’t think that government – at the present time – has the capability, capacity, or confidence to lead on the truly important issues of our day. Continue reading

The Dark Side of Process Efficiency (Part 2)

New Orleans MintI’m an efficiency expert.  My raison d’etre is to make businesses run better, faster, cheaper.  I love the work, which is challenging and rewarding, in more ways than one.  But in recent years, I see a darker side to what I do.

Efficiency increases the divide between employees who are capable of innovation and those who merely follow instructions.  In an earlier post, I mentioned three examples of how automation is taking away jobs, faster than any of us ever imagined, and in a wider variety of professions and industries.

At the present time, the easiest tasks to automate are the ones that don’t require the ability to think on your feet, or reason out problems, or innovate.  We’ve heard before that the drive toward automation and efficiency is increasing the divide between the educated and uneducated workforce.  The thought is that there are going to be fewer jobs in the middle income strata. Continue reading

The Importance of Influencing Peers

Wrong Way SignAt one time, Stephen King decided to stop selling a relatively popular book called “Rage”.  The novel was the first book published under his pseudonym, Richard Bachman, and was written decades ago.   It’s the story of an angry teenager who shoots teachers and holds classmates hostage.

For a while after the book was published, King defended his story, saying that it did not cause anyone to go off the deep end.  Over time, however, the book was found in the belongings of four perpetrators of school shootings, and around 1997, King allowed the book to fall out of publication and apparently asked publishers to remove existing copies from sale.  A few years after that, many applauded his decision, although others thought he should have stood up for the rights of the artist.

This isn’t the only story of how people use their influence to create a better world. Continue reading

It’s Okay That the Corporation Has No Soul…

Man Facing the SunIt’s a well known maxim – “the corporation has no soul”.  I believe that with my whole heart.  People have souls, enterprises don’t.  Sometimes, the culture of an organization allows the collective souls of its employees to set a shining example, but those efforts are still led by feeling, thinking humans.

There are lots of reasons for business to exist, but the overwhelming and primary reason is to make money.  And… if a corporation focuses on that goal without wavering, they will do a lot of good along the way.

Most of us understand the basics of the enterprise.  Every business in the world – from Campbell to Planters – has followed one script… Continue reading

Describe Your First Job… A Great Interview Question

Lemonade StandYesterday, I saw a great post on an HR site, suggesting an out-of-the-box interview question.  Frankly, these are sometimes a dime-a-dozen, but I really like this as a good interview opener:  “Tell me about your first paying job and what you learned from it.”

My first job, at the age of 14, was on a land surveying crew. My dad owned the business and there was only one job available (my older sister was already working in the office, at the reception desk).  It was hot, sweaty, dirty and definitely not the job that a teenage girl dreams of.

What did I learn at that job?   Continue reading

When a “Casual Comment” is Anything But

Stacked WoodLet’s say you’ve recently become a manager.  No doubt, you’re happy with your achievement.  You have a lot more authority to make decisions and to influence others.  Has it occurred to you yet that there could be a downside to your authority?

Kerry Patterson, in the VitalSmarts newsletter, has written an excellent cautionary tale he calls “the captain’s fireplace”.  You can read the original story for yourself, but here’s a quick summary…  The captain of a military base notices some scrap wood in a dumpster and calls to make sure no one else wants it before he grabs some for his fireplace.

The ensign he talks to offers to find out about the scrap wood and calls the chief of supply to make sure it’s okay.  The warrant officer makes a call, and so on, until the captain’s wife eventually calls to thank them for the wood.   Outside in the supply yard, people are grumbling about how they had to cut brand new boards to fit the captain’s fireplace, when they couldn’t afford other vital supplies.

What happened? Continue reading